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Offering ‘green’ benefits: a new tool in the war for talent, reveals Ceridian survey

A survey on benefit choices by Ceridian, one of the largest providers of human resource services in the world, reveals that UK workers would welcome their employers being more environmentally responsible and providing them with more ‘green’ benefits.  Of the 1,000 employees surveyed, 69 per cent think it is important that their employer is environmentally responsible and 57 per cent wish their employers would do more. 

While 14 per cent of employees overall would change jobs for a greener benefits package, a massive 32 per cent of those aged 16 to 24 considered it a likely motivation to move.  Thirty-five per cent of all those surveyed felt that receiving greener benefits would make them more loyal to their employer. 

The top three most attractive ‘green’ benefits would be incentives to move to sustainable electricity/energy (67 per cent), access to discounts on ‘green’ trade recycled products (65 per cent) and discounts on public transport (59 per cent).  Tax-efficient bicycle purchasing or loan schemes, by contrast, were considered much less attractive benefits!

People today recognise they need to do more to ensure the long-term survival of our planet and employees appear to be keen to do their bit when backed by like-minded employers. Reflecting green credentials in benefits packages is a way for employers to differentiate themselves, particularly when targeting new entrants to the labour marketDoug Sawers, Managing Director of Ceridian in the UK

Only ten per cent of the employees surveyed benefited from a company car and, of these, 53 per cent would be interested in the subsidised provision of a ‘greener’ company car but only 36 per cent in the opportunity to offset their carbon emissions from a company car.

Of the 1,000 respondents participating in the online survey, commissioned by Ceridian, all work in the private sector, 46 per cent overall hold managerial jobs and 54 per cent were female.

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